Photo Credit: İlkan Sücüllü

Photo Credit: İlkan Sücüllü

First Public Tests at Game Clinic

On 23rd of July, the first public tasks for the games im Untergrund and Wunderkkamer Wien were hold at the Game Clinic in RaumD in Museumsquartier, hosted by Play:Vienna. These tests were focused on the game experiences and dynamics, along with proof of the technical implementations.

Game Clinics are monthly events organized by Play:Vienna, where game makers can present their games-in-progress to a community of players and get feedback in return. City Games were there with Wunderkammer Wien and im Untergrund, with the players shared in half for each game.

The immediate issue with Wunderkammer Wien test was hardware: GPS just didn’t have reception in most of the locations; therefore, the game master (Tamer) had to provide the hints manually. This was also an interesting thing to consider, a game master coming along with a game. The hint modalities and locations seemed to work; players were able to find the curiosities in acceptable time limits (with total game span with 5 curiosities reaching almost 2 hours). Still, the strongest proof of concept was to realize that, even the Viennese players had not seen most of these interest points before. Even nicer was when one player found a curiosity, as he had been told of its story when he was a boy, on a school trip. This mix of memory and remembering added a completely different feeling to the experience.

Photo Credit: İlkan Sücüllü

Photo Credit: İlkan Sücüllü

Video by Sophie Stallegger (Sophie’s Welt Media)

im Untergrund test was comparably much more fluent: The game board (based on Raspberry Pi) was using a geolocation system based on WiFi networks, instead of GPS. Due to this factor, most of the location based audios were triggered properly, with the board providing the gameflow without the need of a master. In means of game making, the strongest observation came from the fact that sudden revelation of audio in an urban environment was really strong. The players were fluent with following the locations on the map, and listening to the story snippets on these locations.

An interesting thing to note for both games was the fact that experience was changing based on the time of the gameplay. It was the first time games were tested and night time, and this created a very different way of perceiving and interacting with the game and the city.

Another highlight to mention was the presence of FM4 in the test, with interviewing game makers on their concepts. You can read and hear the coverage here:

http://fm4.orf.at/stories/1772116/

Photo Credit: İlkan Sücüllü